Contributors

Many people have contributed to the WUS at 100 book and we are thankful to them all for their hard work. Choose a contributor below to see their articles.

Author profile

James Matale was President of WUS Zambia from 1987 to 1991. He was active in the South African and Namibian scholarship programme. The programme placed several young South African and Namibian refugees in Zambian and overseas colleges and universities. James Matale started his career with the government and the Development Bank of Zambia. He later joined the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines Ltd. and became Deputy Director responsible for non-copper mining operations. Between 1992 and 1994 he was director of the Zambia Privatisation Agency. James Matale holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Zambia and an MBA from the Institute for International Management Development, now of Lausanne, Switzerland. At present, he works as a consultant in Lusaka on issues of investment, institutional reform, privatisation, project planning and analysis.

Author profile

Jane Katjavivi was born in England. Her Masters from the University of Birmingham was in African Studies. She worked at World University Service (UK) in 1975 as a Scholarship Officer, focusing on Southern Africa and with SWAPO in London as an Information Officer from 1976 till 1978, and then moved into magazine and later book publishing. She married the SWAPO activist and historian Peter Katjavivi and they moved to Namibia shortly before Independence. She published Namibian history, literature, life stories, books on democracy and gender, children’s books and science textbooks in her own publishing company, New Namibia Books. She also opened a bookshop Onganda Y’Omambo, and was active in the Association of Namibian Publishers, the Namibia Book Development Council, the African Publishers Network and the African Books Collective. She established a new publishing imprint, Tigereye, and is author of a memoir Undisciplined Heart (2010).

Author profile

John Bevan began in 1979 working for WUS UK as a caseworker on their Chile scholarship programme. In 1980 he became co-Secretary-General of WUS International with Nigel Hartley and Sarah Hayward, job-sharing the position, till 1990. Subsequently he was involved with UN Missions in Haiti and El Salvador. He went on to work for the UN in Haiti, Guatemala, El Salvador, East Timor, DR Congo, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Author profile

John King worked in WUS UK from 1974 to 1975 as part of the Chile team. After his time in WUS described as a “defining moment” he went on to teach Latin American literature, film and cultural history and is now Emeritus Professor of Latin American Cultural History at the University of Warwick.

Author profile

After fleeing and being expelled from East Prussia in 1945, Jonathan Grigoleit studied law and political science in Munich, Berlin (FU) and Hamburg from 1952 to 1958, with a year at the University of Cape Town/ South Africa in between, afterwards at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne. In 1957/58 he was a member of the board of the Verband Deutscher Studentenschaften (VDS). From 1958 to 1959 he was a member of the board of the WUS German Committee and from 1959 to 1961 its General Secretary. He organised the General Assembly of International WUS in 1960 in the Federal Republic. After two years with the Friedrich-EbertStiftung, Bonn, he became director of the International Office of the University of Kiel, from 1967 with interruptions until 1997. In between were a research stay in West Africa (1971) and the direction of the Aspirant College at the Tongji University Shanghai/PR China (1982/83). He was a member of the board of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for 16 years from 1976 to 1992 and a member of the board of the Otto Benecke Foundation, Bonn, from 1990 to 2010. Jonathan Grigoleit is a recipient of the Federal Cross of Merit, 1st class.

Author profile

José Bengoa was a professor at the University of Chile until his expulsion in 1973 for political reasons. He became president of WUS Chile from 1978 until 1995. His numerous visiting professorships include Cambridge University, and he inaugurated the Salvador Allende Chair there in 2017. He was twice rector of the University Academy of Christian Humanism and worked there as professor of Anthropology. He has been an elected member of the UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities four times, a member of the UN Advisory Committee and of the UN Minorities Working Group in Geneva, which he chaired. He was a key speaker at the Santiago conference on the WUS UK programme in 2016.

Author profile

Kaye Thomson joined WUS Canada in 1974 as special assistant to the Executive Director, Bill McNeill. She managed the annual WUSC seminars to Egypt China and Thailand and the new WUSC membership programme as well as the introduction of CARAVAN which replaced the former WUSC Treasure Van. Kaye managed the UN Volunteer Programme for Canada and the new WUSC refugee programme in cooperation with UNHCR and the Canadian government’s immigration department. During her 16 years’ service with WUSC Kaye was appointed Co-Director (with her Chinese government counterpart) of the Canada/China Human Development Programme in Beijing from 1982 to 1984; Field Director of WUSC Malawi from 1987-89; Field Director of WUSC Lesotho from 1990 to 1992 and back to Malawi as Field Director from 1992 to 1994, Later Kaye joined the Canadian Public Health Association in Ottawa on the Southern Africa AIDS Training Programme until her retirement in 1999.

Author profile

Dr Laksiri Fernando was senior lecturer, Political Science, University of Peradeniya before appointment as associate secretary, Asia/Pacific, WUS International from 1984 to 1991. Laksiri studied in Sri Lanka (BA Economics), Canada (MA Political Science) and Australia (PhD Human Rights) and migrated to Australia in 1991. He was deputy director, Human Rights Centre, University of NSW (1991-2); PhD scholar University of Sydney while teaching (1992-1995); executive director of the Diplomacy Training Program at the University of NSW (1995-97); returned to Sri Lanka as professor, Political Science and Public Policy, University of Colombo (1997-2010) where he served as dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies; Director, Centre for the Study of Human Rights, and Director, Peace Building Project, Ministry of Constitutional Affairs. He was also a member of the advisory committee to the president on Constitutional Reforms; director, Sri Lanka Foundation Institute and Television Training Institute; director and Chair, National Centre for Advanced Studies; and a director of the Colombo Stock Exchange. A Japan Foundation scholar (2005-6), and a visiting scholar in several countries, his two major academic publications are: Human Rights, Politics and States: Burma, Cambodia and Sri Lanka and Thomas More’s Socialist Utopia and Ceylon (Sri Lanka). Since retirement to Australia to join his family, he has focused on popular writing with many publications, and is now enjoying a focus on art.

Author profile

Liz Frazer worked with WUS UK from 1974 to 1978 coordinating work with Academics for Chile. She set up WUS publications, liaised with a number of organisations and was instrumental in establishing a reception centre for Chilean refugees at the University of Southampton. After working for WUS she moved on to the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning (now the Council for At-Risk Academics).

Author profile

After joining WUS UK in 1979 from the British Council for Aid to Refugees, Louise Morris worked on overseas student issues. From 1980 to 1993 she administered the WUS UK South Africa Scholarship Program, the Namibia Access Program and the Southern African Campus Scholarship Scheme. From WUS she went to the Nuffield Foundation to run a grant fund for women which she helped extend to refugee women needing to requalify.